Anna Goodson Illustration Agency

Award for Mar Hernández’s latest book


Artwork by Mar Hernandez

The Spanish Ministry of Culture has rewarded Mar’s latest book “Hacia Ningún Lugar”. Edited by Símientes Editores it received the ‘Best Illustrated Book’ award in the call for ‘best edited books in Valencia’.
Here is an article about it: http://bit.ly/1Dou0s8


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News published at 10:48 am, Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Featured Artist – Tina Zellmer


Artwork by Tina Zellmer

Where do you draw your inspiration from?
When I walk around – I always have my eyes open. Everything fuels my imagination. I devour books, films, music, paintings and illustrations, old photos with stains, dreams, random conversations, flowers, trees, clouds, water puddles, old pieces of paper, old boxes, surfaces that have a texture to them (like a wall falling apart or rusting metal). A painting material (like a new color or a brush) can be very inspiring, too.

What is your earliest memory of creating art? (or drawing as a child)
That was in kindergarten. I remember that we were all making butterflies by folding a piece of paper in half, sprinkling wax-pencil pieces in between and then ironing them…. beautiful effect – and I loved my self made “painting”.

As a working illustrator, do you still find time to create art for yourself?
Yes, I still find time to create art for myself… and I think it is actually very important for me to also take the time to do so. That way I am able to experiment and find new inspiration for assignments. If there is time between jobs I like to create big paintings – new unexpected things happen and it is really nice for getting a different kind of energy.
 
What type of transition needs to be made between creating art for yourself and creating art that is commissioned?
When I illustrate for clients, the final visual solution has to communicate to a certain target group. I like the challenge and I get energy and inspiration from it. Of course I have to stay focused and sometimes the deadlines are pretty short, working hours can be long. In my own work I can become lost and go into the illustration or painting. It’s one of my favorite places to go. I can take all the time I want and make images that speak directly to your soul.

What is your favorite way to get out of a creative block?
Whenever that happens I need to get my mind in a different place. I go outside, take a break and do something else. Eat an ice cream, lay in the sun, do some paperwork or walk my little dog.

If you had to describe your body of work in one word, what would that word be?
Layered.


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News published at 10:00 am, Monday, October 13th, 2014

Mar Hernández interviewed by Kuvva


Artwork by Mar Hernandez

Mar Hernández was Interviewed by Kuvva!
Malota: 5 tips to be discovered in the illustration industry
You can read the interview at http://bit.ly/1ut2SFn


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News published at 11:32 am, Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Visual Families


Artwork by Hanna Melin

Hanna Melin was chosen to participate in the new book “Visual Families” published by Gestalten.
Visual Families showcases patterns and collections.


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News published at 11:28 am, Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

IdN v21n3: Editorial Illustration – New Faces of Inspiration


Artwork by Paul Blow

Paul was asked to contribute to the latest edition of IdN.

“Editorial illustration is more than just an added extra to give a page of dense type eye-appeal – it can actually add significantly to the interpretation of a story, especially if it features a face. We asked 10 specialists to share their trade secrets with us.”


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News published at 9:55 am, Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Featured Artist – Gemma Correll


Artwork by Gemma Correll

How and when did you know that you wanted to become an illustrator?
I knew from a very young age. My parents had lots of books with comics by Gary Larson (The Far Side) and the British cartoonist Giles, and I would spend hours reading them, even though a lot of the jokes went over my head. I started making my own comics and illustrated “books” using old notepads when I was six. I had shelves of them and would give them to my friends as presents, personalising the characters with their names. At school, I was often asked to design the posters for fêtes, or the flyers for Christmas nativities. Any activity that involved writing or drawing was instantly my favourite and I knew that illustration was what I wanted to do for a living.

As a working illustrator, do you still find time to create art for yourself?
Yes. It’s very important to me to be able to create personal work. I draw a lot in sketchbooks and I also keep a “daily diary”- a journal of the days events. I’m lucky in that my drawing style is quick and spontaneous, so even when I’m really busy with commissions, I’m usually able to find time to create some art for myself, too, even if it’s just a few doodles in my sketchbook.

What type of artwork do you have hanging in your home?
I love collecting prints by other artists and illustrators, but we don’t have much wall-space at the moment, so a lot of it is stored in folders. I can’t wait to move house and fill a wall with all the beautiful artwork. I have prints by artists like Mia Christopher, Lizzy Stewart and Christine Berrie and also an original mounted drawing by Maxwell Holyoke-Hirsch. Along with the “real” art, we have a fantastic collection of bad art and kitchy postcards that we’ve picked up at sales and thrift stores over the years.

What is your favorite way to get out of a creative block?
I’ll make myself a coffee, grab a cupcake (or two) and sit down with my sketchbook. I try to stay relaxed and not worry if it doesn’t work. If I have an off-day, I try to accept it as such and not stress out… Often, the day that follows will be super-productive and I’ll have so many ideas that I even can’t get them all down onto paper.

Is there any one publication that you still have aspirations to see yourself in?
The New Yorker… Specifically, the cover of The New Yorker. A girl can dream…

What magazines do you personally read?
I am a magazine addict. Some of my favourites are Bust, Frankie, Uppercase and Elle Decoration, as well as the Saturday “Weekend” supplement that comes with The Guardian (UK) newspaper. I like my magazines to be aesthetically pleasing, but with interesting reading matter too.

What are your goals for your future as an illustrator?
I feel like I’ve found my niche, style-wise, so now I’d like to expand my horizons a little. One of my favourite areas of Illustration is narrative – words are often a focal point in my work – and I’d really like to work in the areas of graphic novels and children’s books.


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News published at 9:24 am, Monday, September 15th, 2014

Featured Artist – Andy Potts


Artwork by Andy Potts

How and when did you know that you wanted to become an illustrator?
I knew from an early age that I wanted to ‘make pictures’ in some way when I grew up, as I’d been drawing and painting for as long as I could remember. I only realized there was a possible vocation for me called illustration much later on during my Foundation in Art course at Stourbridge College in 1991. It was here I began to focus on illustration, which I enjoyed the most after trying my hand at a variety of creative disciplines.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?
Absolutely everywhere really, I like to throw a lot of things into the blender to see what happens. I tend to draw visual stimulus from film, music, photography, unusual ephemera or found items. Of course I have my favourite artists and illustrators but I try to avoid looking to them for direction or stylistic cues, I prefer to fumble around experimenting until I get excited about where a piece is heading.

What is your earliest memory of creating art? (or drawing as a child)
I can’t remember the very early years, but I was probably scribbling in the womb somehow. I used to absolutely love recreating my favourite film posters and creating my own comic strips, usually unfinished, as my patience would run out very quickly. I was obsessed with sci-fi and fantasy as a kid so everything tended to be insanely over the top. Some might say it still is.

What type of environment do you prefer to work in? At home or in a studio? Listening to music?
I’ve worked at home and in a studio and ultimately I prefer to be in a studio with a creative group around me for support and inspiration. I find it helps to keep me sane separating the home and work environment, I could stay indoors for days when I worked at home which got too freakish. Music is a constant whether I’m at home or the studio, although there’s more Spotify infighting at the studio.

As a working illustrator, do you still find time to create art for yourself?
I’ve found it pretty frustrating over the last year or two trying to find time to create personal work. It’s really great that I’ve been busy, but it’s good to shake up your style now and again to keep it fresh for yourself and clients. I’ve made a point of sketching and doodling a lot while working on commercial jobs recently and will make as much time as possible this year for personal work.

What type of transition needs to be made between creating art for yourself and creating art that is commissioned?
I don’t find that there’s a huge gap in thinking between my personal and commercial work. I enjoy the freedom of working for myself and truly experimenting, but I also enjoy working to a tight brief and/or deadline and making a client happy. For me the two differing disciplines inform and spark off each other and I’ll apply what I’ve learned from both to my overall approach to the work.

When you are creating commissioned work, how do you take yourself out of the project and focus on the idea that needs to be conveyed?
With a commissioned work I’ll read the brief and/or article and I hope to get a mental picture of where I want the illustration to go while I read. I’ll generally have a vague grasp of the theme, composition and colours, which I scribble down in a very basic way then I’ll do some visual research and flesh out the concept while I create it, welcoming any happy accidents along the way. I tend to work up the first idea I get fired up about as it’s generally the strongest, if I think too long then I start to dither and waste time.

What type of artwork do you have hanging in your home?
I am the world’s worst handyman and have nothing hanging in my home at the moment but I do have lots resting against walls if that counts. Mostly illustration work by people I admire. At the studio I have personal framed work and works in progress hanging around the desk to mark my patch.

What accomplishment so far in your life stands out as most important?
So far it’s managing to make a living out of what I love and marrying the love of my life, Liz.

Who was the first illustrator that you noticed and admired?
Difficult to pick out just the one. As a youth I was hugely influenced by visual futurist Syd Mead along with sci-fi/fantasy artists such as H R Giger and Chris Foss. I then discovered the greats like Francis Bacon, David Hockney and Andy Warhol followed by contemporary illustrators such as David Hughes, Ralph Steadman and Joe Magee as I began to study the discipline.

Are there any other current illustrators that you feel you identify with or share a similar style?
I’m a big fan of a lot of the AGM illustrators and have a number of friends in the field who I admire, but not many who I would say I share a style with. I exhibited with my friend Tim Marrs and found our styles gel together well. I’ve also been a part of British illustration collective Black Convoy in the past and worked with the likes of Mcfaul, NCC, Andrew Rae and John Burgerman where the creative clash of different styles generated the excitement. I currently collaborate on animations with illustrator Mark Taplin under the banner of Action Stations and always welcome the opportunity to work with others.

Do you read criticism done on your work?
I haven’t really had the opportunity to read much criticism of my own work but I’m sure I would as I think it can be valuable and I’m incredibly nosey. I did read a blog recently with a mild critique of some of my work and I found it quite funny, but I’m sure too much of it would, no doubt, bring me down.

How do you deal with negative criticism?
If it’s constructive then I take it on board, otherwise I let it go… or run at them screaming with a hatchet.

What is your favorite way to get out of a creative block?
Physically remove myself from the situation (usually the monitor) and drown in a vat of coffee.

If you had to describe your body of work in one word, what would that word be?
Eye-popping .

Is there any one publication that you still have aspirations to see yourself in?
I aspire to be in every publication, I’m easy.

What magazines do you personally read?
I read 3×3, Varoom, Creative Review – the usual suspects.

What are your goals for your future as an illustrator?
To keep on keeping on. I’m always trying to develop the illustration work to keep it relevant and of a consistent quality. I also want to expand the mini-empire by continuing to move into animation, art direction and focus a little more on personal projects. That would mean figuring out how to delegate work so maybe I need to clone myself at some point or build a time stretching device.

What question do you wish an interviewer would ask you?
This one.


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News published at 10:00 am, Monday, September 1st, 2014

Featured Artist – Marta Antelo


Artwork by Marta Antelo

How and when did you know that you wanted to become an illustrator?
I studied Fine Arts and in my second year I saw that most of my personal work was small in size and that my visual language was very illustrative. When my future partner met me that year he told me “I’ll take your work to the Illustrators Association”. That is when I started to receive my first assignments.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?
In old magazines, children’s books and the art of the early 20th Century. I love paint, so colors are very important in my work.

What is your earliest memory of creating art? (or drawing as a child)
I suppose when I was a teenager. At this stage I was very perceptive with art, I was discovering it. But a little earlier, from when I was eleven, I used to carry a sketchbook and spend many hours drawing.

What type of environment do you prefer to work in? At home or in a studio?
I like working at home, especially when there is bad weather. I usually listen to music and the radio.

As a working illustrator, do you still find time to create art for yourself?
I have little time for personal work, but I continue to draw everywhere.

What type of transition needs to be made between creating art for yourself
and creating art that is commissioned?

Commissioned art is always limited by delivery dates, dimensions, the story… so I love having enough time to experiment a little.

When you are creating commissioned work, how do you take yourself out of the project and focus on the idea that needs to be conveyed?
I underline the most important ideas, like when I was at school and we did a text analysis. I write down those ideas and look for synonyms, then draw the ideas with elements or objects, seeking visual metaphors.

What type of artwork do you have hanging in your home?
Sometime I hang the last illustrations I have done with tacks to analyze them. I hang my favorites too, and work from other illustrators (printed or original) like an engraving I bought some months ago or art that friends give me as presents. I also display puppets made by me.

What accomplishment so far in your life stands out as most important?
I can’t choose one, I suppose there are many because I consider myself to be a lucky person.

Who was the first illustrator that you noticed and admired?
I was very impressed when I discovered Pablo Amargo’s work, with his book “No todas las vacas son iguales”. He is a very talented Spanish contemporary illustrator.

Are there any other current illustrators that you feel you identify with or
share a similar style?

I try to have an original style and I admire many illustrators, both young and veterans, with different styles. I think my style is ‘naive’ so I identify myself with naive illustrators.

Do you read criticism done on your work?
When somebody writes criticism about an illustrator it is because he/she loves it, so it is always good criticism!

How do you deal with negative criticism?
I would not mind it as it is impossible for everyone to love you. Each person has his or her own personality.

What is your favorite way to get out of a creative block?
Go for a walk.

If you had to describe your body of work in one word, what would that word
be?

Naive?

What magazines do you personally read?
Spanish Magazines like “CLIJ” (about children’s literature), “El País semanal” a weekly magazine about current subjects, and sometimes “eñe” about contemporary writers.


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News published at 10:00 am, Monday, August 4th, 2014

Marisa Morea on Ape On The Moon


Artwork by Marisa Morea

Marisa Morea’s work has been featured in Ape On The Moon, one of the best sites about contemporary illustration. Well done!


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News published at 9:27 am, Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Roadshow


Artwork by Marilyn Faucher

Marilyn Faucher is going to be part of the Roadshow during the ICON8 illustration conference on July 10th at the Portland Art Museum.


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News published at 10:00 am, Tuesday, June 17th, 2014